Get used to being uncomfortable

After going through the Certified Scrum Master class (I am fancy now!), I’ve been re-evaluating how projects are ‘managed’ at work. We are not fully agile, but we’ve been slowly applying some of the agile concepts and structures to our workflows. In an agency environment, where projects are fast, furious, and many at the same time, there is not always the luxury of doing full scrum processes.

In addition, I play both Product Owner and Scrum Master, which is less than ideal. I represent the client’s interests, prioritize backlogs, and also try to help the team organize themselves for delivery, remove their roadblocks, and basically keep them running smoothly. I think I play Product Owner well. But I’ve realized I’m not an awesome Scrum Master right now.

We need to shift towards more team choices where the team decides what to do next – I’m trying to adjust my phrasing and my approach to conversations so that the team feels more empowered to make choices on their own, that they don’t depend on me to tell them what to do. It’s an interesting shift. I feel like I’m forcing them to take more control – and that they don’t always want it!

It’s a good transition, and a necessary one as well. The process is a little bumpy, but we’re getting there. I have this vision of a group of awesome people who can discuss issues, make choices, and perform to their stated expectations all on their own initiative. A group that can control their own environment, and that feels not only empowered to make change, but a group that feels the ability to change and improve is their opportunity and obligation.

We’re gonna get there. Strap in and hunker down. We’re gonna get used to being uncomfortable. It’s a price of change that I’m willing to pay.

Master the basics first

Very good advice:

Until you can reliably deliver what you thought you could deliver, focus on how you define and build software. You don’t need Lean or Kanban or to improve your stand-up meeting. You need to learn how to define, build, and deliver software.

Don’t be distracted by nuance if you can’t get the basic gist correct. Deliver what you say you will deliver. And only work on that until you can do it. Be functional first. And then work on refinements.